Chameleon by Zoe Kalo


chameleon

 

The author sent me an ARC of this book (epub format) in exchange for an honest review.

My rating:  ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐

Plot
(by Goodreads)

An isolated convent, a supernatural presence, a dark secret…



17-year-old Paloma only wanted to hold a séance to contact her dead father. She never thought she would be kicked out of school and end up in an isolated convent. Now, all she wants is to be left alone. But slowly, she develops a bond with a group of girls: kind-hearted Maria, insolent Silvy, pathological liar Adelita, and their charismatic leader Rubia.

When, yet again, Paloma holds a séance in the hope of contacting her father, she awakens an entity that has been dormant for years. And then, the body count begins. Someone doesn’t want the secret out…

Are the ghost and Paloma’s suspicions real—or only part of her growing paranoia and delusions?

Genre(s): Children’s eBooks > Sci-Fi, Fantasy & Scary Stories > Scary Stories
Teen & Young Adult > Horror
Children’s Books > Sci-Fi & Fantasy > Spine-Chilling Horror
Series: n.a.
Length: 187 pages
Release date: 2017-02-02

 

Teaser


Rubia said something else, but by then I’d turned my face to the call of the waterfall and wasn’t listening anymore. For an instant, a terrible sensation gripped me, as if the sweet-smelling flowers had suddenly wilted and rotted. I was spiraling down, down. then hands, pulling me up.


My Opinion

This book introduces you to 17-year-old Paloma, expelled from school after holding a séance. She is sent to a convent in the middle of nowhere, hoping to be left in peace.

With Chameleon, Zoe Kalo has created an extraordinary story of a young woman who just wants to contact her dead father. Strange things are happening at the convent as some secrets better stay buried. It is a compelling read, drawing you close to Paloma and the events. I suffered with Paloma, inwardly rebelling against the strict rules, and being as surprised by some revelations. Zoe Kalo knows how to keep you glued to the story, giving you the feeling that there is a hidden layer of the past – or evil – on top of your normal world. [You can certainly relate if you watched The Orphanage (2007) starring Belén Rueda.] Paloma is quite complex, Rubia is of considerable depth, the other characters are of sufficient depth (according to their relevance). The story comprises realistic characters in a normal environment with an odd touch, interesting turns, and has a good flow.

This is a book for you if you like young adult suspense stories with paranormal aspects, characters who might turn out every which way, and a subtle creepiness.

Recommended.

In brief:

Cover ⭐ ⭐ ⭐
Writing ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐
Plot ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐
Characters ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐
Mood Suspenseful
Pace Steady
POV First person – past tense
Language :mrgreen:
Violence 😳
Sexual content :mrgreen:

 

About the author

A certified bookworm, Zoe Kalo has always been obsessed with books and reading. Reading led to writing—compulsively. No surprise that at 16, she wrote her first novel, which her classmates read and passed around secretly. The pleasure of writing and sharing her fantasy worlds has stayed with her, so now she wants to pass her stories to you with no secrecy—but with lots of mystery…

A daughter of adventurous expats, she’s had the good fortune of living on 3 continents, learning 4 languages, and experiencing a multicultural life. Currently, she’s working on a Master’s degree in Comparative Literature, which she balances between writing, taking care of her clowder of cats, and searching for the perfect bottle of pinot noir.

Connect with the author:

Please take a look at my statement on reading in My train of thoughts on …reading.  Now I am asking you.  🙂

My questions for you bibliophiles:
What about you?  What did you think about Chameleon?  Or – if you did not yet read Chameleon – are you now interested in reading it yourself?

I am looking forward to reading your comments.  🙂

 

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2 thoughts on “Chameleon by Zoe Kalo

    • It is, Sandra. If you know ‘The Devil’s Backbone’ and ‘The Orphanage’, you certainly understand why I can relate to the mood in ‘Chameleon’.

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