2017-07 Ireland – Charles Fort – slide show

Dear friends and readers,

please enjoy this year’s Charles Fort impressions.

 

In brief:

Country – Ireland
Province – Munster
County – Cork

Charles Fort (Irish: Dún Chathail) is a star fort located on the water’s edge, at the southern end of the village of Summer Cove, on Kinsale harbour, County Cork, Ireland. First completed in 1682, Charles Fort was sometimes historically referred to as the “new fort” – to contrast with James’ Fort (the “old fort”) which had been built on the other side of Kinsale harbour before 1607. The fort is now operated as a heritage tourism site by the Heritage Ireland arm of the Office of Public Works.
Charles Fort was built on the site of an earlier stronghold known as Ringcurran Castle. The Ringcurran defences had featured prominently during the Siege of Kinsale in 1601.
With a focus on seaward defence, the landward and inland bastions of the fort are overlooked by higher ground. This weakness was of critical importance when the fort was subject to a 13-day siege in 1690 during the Williamite War in Ireland. John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough (then 1st Earl) besieged Cork and captured Kinsale and its forts. Repairs were made following the siege.
An early lighthouse was established here in the 17th century by Robert Reading, and additional works (including internal citadel defences) were added through the 18th and 19th centuries.

The fort remained in use as a British Army barracks for two hundred years afterwards, before being relinquished by British forces following the Anglo-Irish Treaty of 1921. The fort fell out of use after being burned by retreating anti-Treaty forces during the Irish Civil War in 1922.

The complex remained largely derelict for some time, but was named a National Monument of Ireland in 1971. Over the coming decades several sections of the fort were restored by the Irish heritage service. Restoration and development of the complex was later taken-over by the Office of Public Works (OPW) – including the development of an exhibition space in the former commander’s quarters. Charles Fort is one of the most visited OPW sites in the region, attracting in excess of 86,000 visitors in 2015.


Peace, coffee, and a cheesecake. ☘

 

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2017-07 Ireland – Ring of Beara – slide show

Dear friends and readers,

please enjoy this year’s Ring of Beara impressions.

 

In brief:

Beara Peninsula

Country – Ireland
Counties – Kerry, Cork

Beara (Irish: Béarra) or the Beara Peninsula is a peninsula on the south-west coast of Ireland, bounded between the Kenmare “river” (actually a bay) to the north side and Bantry Bay to the south. It has two mountain ranges running down its centre: the Caha Mountains and the Slieve Miskish Mountains. The northern part of the peninsula from Kenmare to near Ardgroom is in County Kerry, while the rest forms the barony of Bear in County Cork.

Beara was the traditional seat of power of the O’Sullivan Beare and was one of the last points of native Irish resistance after the Battle of Kinsale. Allihies, on the tip of Beara, later became major copper mines and featured in the Daphne du Maurier novel ‘Hungry Hill’ also made into a film.

The “Ring of Beara” is a tourist trail for cars which follows the roads for about 148 kilometres (92 mi) circumnavigating the peninsula. It starts in Kenmare, crossing the Healy Pass through Adrigole, passing Castletownbere, Allihies, and turn offs to Dursey Island, Eyeries and Ardgroom, ending in Glengarriff. The area has had a long connection with the sea; Castletownbere is one of Ireland’s largest fishing ports and the largest white fishing port. It has diving, sailing and boating facilities.

The Beara Peninsula forms part of the Wild Atlantic Way.


Peace, coffee, and a cheesecake. ☘

P.S.:  Did you note the traffic sign, and compared the road and the car?  😀

 

2017-07 Ireland – Gougane Barra – slide show

Dear friends and readers,

please enjoy this year’s Gougane Barra impressions.

 

 

In brief:

Country – Ireland
Province – Munster
County – Cork

Gougane Barra (Irish: Guagán Barra, “the rock of Barra”) is a settlement west of Macroom in County Cork, Ireland.

The name Gougane Barra comes from Saint Finbarr, who is said to have built a monastery on an island in the lake nearby during the 6th century. During the times of the Penal Laws, Gougane Barra’s remoteness meant that it became a popular place for the celebration of the Roman Catholic Mass. The nineteenth century oratory which stands near the original monastery is famous for its picturesque location and richly decorated interior and is a popular place for weddings.

The source of the River Lee rises in the hills above the park and flows into Gougane lake. The forest park has 5 km of motor trail and 10 km of hill walks, nature points and vista trails.


Peace, coffee, and a cheesecake. ☘

P.S.:  Did you note the sea snake in the slide show?  😀

 

2017-07 Ireland – Donkey Sanctuary – slide show

Dear friends and readers,

please enjoy this year’s Donkey Sanctuary impressions.

 

Donkey Sanctuary:  http://www.thedonkeysanctuary.ie/

I could not resist – I adopted Jacksie for my friend Francesca. She adores donkeys, Jacksie is the perfect match. She gets an update on Jacksie every six months, is happy. I tried to reach her mother on my return, to ‘warn’ her about this special gift. A little later I received a call by her highly thrilled and grateful daughter.  🙂

“You don’t adopt a donkey – they adopt you.” My encounter with the donkeys – especially Jacksie – proves it.

 

Liscarroll in brief:

Country – Ireland
Province – Munster
County – Cork

Liscarroll (Irish: Lios Cearúill, meaning “Carroll’s ringfort”) is a village in County Cork, Ireland The village is located on the R522 regional road near Mallow and Buttevant about two miles south of River Awbeg.


Peace, coffee, and a cheesecake. ☘

 

2017-07 Ireland – The Beacon – slide show

Dear friends and readers,

Baltimore visitors also like to explore (suitable shoes required) a special attraction:  The Beacon.

Enjoy.

 

In brief:

The Baltimore Beacon is a white-painted stone beacon at the entrance to the harbour at Baltimore, County Cork, Ireland. The beacon was built at the order of the British government following the 1798 Rebellion. It was part of a series of lighthouses and beacons dotted around the Irish coast, forming a warning system.

The beacon is locally known as “Lot’s Wife”, after the Biblical woman turned into a pillar of salt.


Peace, coffee, and a cheesecake. ☘